articles and essays

'Pele With a Skirt’: The Unequal Fortunes of Brazil's Soccer Stars, Neymar and Marta (The Atlantic)

Excerpt: "One of the nation’s best players makes $15 million a year. The other can’t find a team to sign her."  

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Pinoe's Biggest Fan
(US Soccer)

Excerpt: “Brian Rapinoe has newspaper clippings of the Women’s World Cup bracket taped to the wall of his prison cell."

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American Rejects: Ever been cut? So have these USWNT players (Slate)

Excerpt: "USA v. Japan: These Six U.S. Stars Were Rejected From Youth Teams. It Made Them Great."  

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Christen Press's long U.S. national team road at last leads to World Cup
(Sports Illustrated)

Excerpt: “On January 31, 2012, Christen Press woke up to a text message from her teammate: “Oh my God, have you heard the news?” She opened her inbox and there it was–the email announcement that the Women's Professional Soccer league was folding."

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Soccer Moms: The Comeback Stories of the Professional Soccer Moms. Can Having a baby make you better? (The Atlantic)

Excerpt: "Until 20 years ago, women players who wanted to start a family would quit their careers. But more athletes are stepping up to the challenge of balancing motherhood with their love of the game."  

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The World Cup's Sideline Siblings
(The Atlantic)

Excerpt: “What happens when you've devoted your life to soccer—but it's your brother, not you, who ends up competing for global glory?"

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Sydney Leroux carves own path, going from child troublemaker to U.S. star (Sports Illustrated)

Excerpt: "Sydney Leroux, 13, had a bleached blond Mohawk. She had tattoos. And club coach Les Armstrong, who was there to scout her for his Sereno Soccer Club team, took one look at her and thought, “Oh my god, this girl is nuts.”"  

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USWNT midfielder Carli Lloyd makes determination her defining trait
(Sports Illustrated)

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SWNT's Alex Morgan had late start yield meteoric rise in women's soccer (Sports Illustrated)

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You’ve Earned the Right
(US Soccer)

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Swim on Through to the Other Side (US Soccer)

Excerpt: "“You want to hear a story about Kelley O’Hara? Here’s one that tells you everything you need to know.””  

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Becky Vocabulary
(US Soccer)

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Vive la Ziza (8by8 Magazine)

Excerpt: "Louisa Nécib is the next coming of Zinedine Zidane—and she’s ready to lead Les Bleues to glory”  

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The Audacity of Hope: What Hope Solo's Memoir Says About the Growth of the Women's Game(Howler Magazine)

Excerpt: "THERE’S SOMETHING TELLING IN THE EVOLUTION of name-based puns in female soccer stars’ memoirs. In Mia Hamm’s Go for the Goal, the first chapter is titled “There is No Me in Mia”—quite the opposite sentiment of the genre’s new arrival, Solo: A Memoir of Hope. While one generation’s star focuses on being a team player, the other’s prides herself on going it alone."

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Pickup Soccer and the United States National Teams (Sports Illustrated)

Excerpt: "When I taught first-year composition at the University of Notre Dame in 2006, Matt Besler, then a freshman on the soccer team, was once of my students. As I understood it, he was good, one of the few freshmen to make an immediate impact--something I wouldn't have guessed from looking at him. He was skinny and Midwestern: dirty blond cropped hair, red skin, friendly eyes, wide grin. He looked straight out of a 1950s Coca Cola commercial. Plus, he was smart, one of the strongest writers in my class..."  

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Pelada: Pickup, the Essence of the Game
(The New York Times)

Excerpt: "...In other countries, fields aren’t usually empty at sunset. And there aren’t signs in parks forbidding the world’s most popular game. Maybe we do have a culture problem. We aren’t, however, the only country to fret about the state of pickup; in nearly every place we went (Brazil included), people told us it was a dying art, practices and regiment replacing aimless, exploratory afternoons in the alley."

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© 2013 Gwendolyn Oxenham - All Rights Reserved